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Gabriel Brown

Terrifc article. Very clear.

I'm looking into EAP-SIM/AKA authentication for smartphones on WiFi networks. Curiously, almost none of the Android devices in the market are able to support the SIM challenge necessary for EAP-SIM/AKA.

There's a thread here: http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=9329

The only device that can seems to be the Galaxy Tab. The "WiFi Calling" apps on UMA/GAN Android devices obviously can access SIM credentials, but these are special builds. (And still do not support EAP-SIM/AKA).

I understand this is temporary situation that results from it not having been a priority for manufacturers. Anyone have any insight into progress on this front?

HY

Interesting topic. In terms of the chipsets I think separating the apps core and radio modem makes a lot of sense especially for higher end phones. However the single chip solution has it's advantages - likely it can save some space on the board, the interface between the apps and radio core is internal so it's less complicated than mix-matching the two; and likely it'll save some cost and development time for the phone manufacture. Perhaps good for low-mid tier phones. If the device is designed to support high end features, and sometimes if the OS does support multitasking, then it's going to be a lot higher requirement for the apps core - consider the scenario when the baseband modem dumps xxMbps data (from LTE/HSPA+ etc) to the apps core, and if there're other things going on simultaneously such as high definition video/audio, gaming, music playback etc, then it's certainty going to push the apps core to its boiling limit. In this case some manufactures may want to have the flexibility to choose a more powerful apps processor. However depending on the solution, some glue logics may have to be put in between the two in case some functionalities don't work together directly. Pros and cons for both; depending on the manufacture I guess.

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